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Roland Smith

(1)

An aluminium frame with stainless steel bolts is vulnerable to galvanic corrosion. Unless you use nonconductive spacers, which doesn't seem to be the case from the pictures on their website.

Best not use this bike anywhere near salt water!

Jason

(2)

Something doesn't seem 'right' about the pricing of these; I use similar aluminum and stainless steel bolts to construct solar panel racks and I find it hard to believe these runs over a few hundred; UNLESS theres some serious coin in the gearing/wheels; I'd like to see a price breakdown of parts in a parts list, X# Bolts, X# Lengths of aluminum, then the seat,etc. etc,.

Roland Smith

(3)

@Jason (#2)

The biggest cost will probably be labor. There is a lot of assembly on these bikes.

Gear hub and shifter will be in the order of € 200. A single disk brake set will be € 60-100. 20" rims are around € 10-15 a piece. 20" tires € 12-20, inner tubes around € 5.

Marc

(4)

I rode the recumbent cargo trike model about two years ago. I thought the idea is great but the trike is really awfull. Handling is downright scary even unloaded and I'm not scared very easy and rode only at 15-18km/h.

Since I own a recumbent trike (ICE Sprint) and use it for my daily commute (20.000km+ so far) I know quite well how a recumbent trike should handle even at 50-60km/h.

kris de decker

(5)

Since they presented the cycles "after more than two years of research and development", I guess you were riding an early prototype.

salloignon thibaut

(6)

I'm also working on my own modular bike concept build from aluminium profils.
The frame is 100% mecanicly assembled without any drilling, that means you can reuse the tubes and connectors.
https://sites.google.com/site/cycleentransition/services/modular-bike

laceration

(7)

Bicycle frames take a lot of stresses, hence the welded frame. You don't see a lot that varies much from the classic double triangle for good reason. I'm wondering about the robustness of this. That's a lot of bolts to have to tighten. Every bolt on every bicycle needs to be tightened periodically.

thibaut

(8)

The bike is stiff, a little bit heavier than a regular bike (16kg). Diamond frame is great for sport bikes but we don't need that mutch stiffness for utilitary bicycles. The bolts are "vibrarion ready", the connectors are made for industrial machines with a lot of vibration. The first goal of this bike is to make a quickly and cheaply adjustable prototype.

It's really great to add or remove pieces of frame or connect two bike together, make it long or short,... And every one can do it, so I hope to help people to be creative with bikes with this concept.

Mike Nomad

(9)

Great idea & concept.

Sleeves of a different material to isolate the bolt from the tubing would address stress at the join of different tensile materials, people over-tightening fasteners during the build, and perhaps the corrosion issues mentioned.

The only questions are: Which material for the sleeves (and) drill bigger holes or use smaller diameter bolts?

And, locking nuts w/ nylon inserts would keep things snug.

BTW, I don't see any mention of torque settings...

zeev

(10)

this is a terrible idea for a bike, but a great idea for prototyping.

there are companies that make these types of struts that let people build mecano style construction at full scale.

there are MANY DEDICATED BLOGS TO TRIKES AND CARGO BICYCLES IN EUROPE AND AMERICA------and they look at the practical aspects of making these machines

unfortunately, because these cargo style hpv's are not yet popular , they remain fairly expensive compared to ordinary bikes,but the prices are coming down radically.

the TRIKE is far more practical for hauling cargo than the bike because it does not have balance issues with windage and at slow speeds and acceleration breaking.

cargo bikes are not made for high speed cornering , so the only 'high speed' issues that a cargo vehicle has are breaking issues. the more weight you add the harder breaking is, especially downhill or in an urban setting where rapid breaking may be required.

there are substantial debates both in the bike world over the 'long john' versus 'long tail' design. but one thing is clear, the Single big wheel combined with load bearing small wheel has become the standard go to setup for both.

in the trike world, it has long been accepted that the 2 wheel in back ( delta) design is ideal for urban cargo whereas the 2 wheel in front with center of gravity VERY low to the ground is optimized for sport riding and speed riding ( with electric hotrodding trikes proving that a 4kilowatt small motor can easily propel a small unfaired trike to 90 miles and hour on a drag strip .

there are a few new innovators building fully double wishbone suspension systems for cargo/dual rider style urban trikes . these new styles allow the rider to sit high, with or without extra weight (as passenger and cargo) while retaining the benefits of 2 front wheel breaking and steering.

in the trike world ( motorized and nonmotorized) many years of experience have shown that the benefits and simplicity of the delta design which result from single wheel steering separated from leaf spring simple rear suspension) come directly at the cost of trading off better front steering with two wheel---and the simplicity of power transmission to one back wheel WITHOUT having to use an axle or differential that is the benefit inherent in the tadpole design)

furthermore the suspension of the front and back wheels are fare more complex in a tadpole design As well as the possibility of dual wheel transmission being very difficult to impossible.

many designers have tried innovating their way around the essential tradeoffs between delta and tadpole designs by implementing such designs as 'rear wheel steering' in tadpole designs. These efforts are generically failures and yet they are attempted AGAIN AND AGAIN. other exotic modification 'solutions' include the 'tilting' back axis delta designs that have been tried many many times to find a way to improve the tipping tendency of delta designs at high speed. other have tried experimenting with very low center of gravity 'delta' designs and other even attempting to use tilting mechanisms for the back two wheel .

the problem of complexity is ever present in all of these pseudo solutions.

essentially ----the delta versus tadpole design tradeoffs are 'mature' in the engineering sense, and most all attempts at solving the problem leave much to be desired .

the modular cargo cycle above dispenses with any attempts at solving the problem with utilizing the tadpole design for cargo. and simply copies the designs of the past and existing front loading cargo trikes (see worksman cycles for existing front loader cargo style trikes)

in this way, they have chosen an inferior design , inherently limited to far slower speeds than a delta style urban cargo carrier---and have chosen to use expensive modular technology to bring down the cost of labor ordinarily priced into the bike's retail price at delivery.


this is an exercise in helping people build their own devices, not in helping people who need cargo solutions find a highly superior solution as found in copying or even improving upon the modern high quality designs that already exist.

furthermore, the 800 pound gorrilla in the cargo bike and trike world is ELECTRIFICATION, which is already hitting new york city as pedicabs illegally add electric kits to their trikes, increasingly using the 'direct' drive clamp on motors which are concealed below the undercarraige, as opposed to the hub motors which are exposed in the front wheel of a delta pedicab---available for police to see them.


if modular design is a good thing, the question is for what is it good for? generically it is used for buildings and static objects.

modular toy and electronic kits are sold on the market for designing electronics education kits for children teens and adults for learning and experimenting with electronics. they allow you to make a multitude of objects and bring SKILLS directly to human beings for cheap, even helping people to learn how to fix things instead of throw them out and make them disposable.

with a modular bike kit, i'm not sure you are learning these skills on how to fix, design or otherwise 'work' on bicycles. this almost looks more like an attempt at 'pre-fab' bicycles that can be easily 'put together' by the user. i don't see a big advantage in this when the parts themselves are not only more expensive but inferior in quality to less expensive standardized bicycle/tricycle components per pound of metal per unit of stiffness. bicycle tubing is generically the best design. modular I and T beam types components just don't measure up in this basic performance metric for carrying a cargo load.

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